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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 79-83

Use of ventilator associated pneumonia bundle and statistical process control chart to decrease VAP rate in Syria


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Al-Mouassat Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Critical Care Services, General Assembly of Damascus Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Al-Bassel Heart Institute, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
4 Critical Care Services, Ibn Al-Nafees Hospital, Saudi Arabia
5 World Health Organization (Damascus Office), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
6 Adult Critical Care Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Mazen Kherallah
King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, P. O. Box 3354, MBC #94, Riyadh
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2231-0770.110736

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Objective: Implementation of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) bundle as a performance improvement project in the critical care units for all mechanically ventilated patients aiming to decrease the VAP rates. Materials and Methods: VAP bundle was implemented in 4 teaching hospitals after educational sessions and compliance rates along with VAP rates were monitored using statistical process control charts. Results: VAP bundle compliance rates were steadily increasing from 33 to 80% in hospital 1, from 33 to 86% in hospital 2 and from 83 to 100% in hospital 3 during the study period. The VAP bundle was not applied in hospital 4 therefore no data was available. A target level of 95% was reached only in hospital 3. This correlated with a decrease in VAP rates from 30 to 6.4 per 1000 ventilator days in hospital 1, from 12 to 4.9 per 1000 ventilator days in hospital 3, whereas VAP rate failed to decrease in hospital 2 (despite better compliance) and it remained high around 33 per 1000 ventilator days in hospital 4 where VAP bundle was not implemented Conclusion: VAP bundle has performed differently in different hospitals in our study. Prevention of VAP requires a multidimensional strategy that includes strict infection control interventions, VAP bundle implementation, process and outcome surveillance and education.


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