Avicenna Journal of Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 148--153

Are cardiac patients in Saudi Arabia provided adequate instructions when they should not drive?


Rami M Abazid1, Mohammed Ewid2, Hossam Sherif3, Osama A Smettei5, Abdul Salim Khan4, Abdullah A Altorbag5, Mohammad F Alharbi5, Abdulrahman N Aljaber5, Suliman M Alharbi5, Nora A Altorbak5, Sarah A Altorbak5, Ahmad Almeman6 
1 Department of Nuclear Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Canada, Department of Cardiac Imaging, Prince Sultan Cardiac Center Qassim PSCCQ, Buraydah, El Qassim, Saudi Arabia
2 Faculty of Medicine, Suliman Al Rajhi Colleges, Buraydah, El Qassim, Saudi Arabia, Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt, Saudi Arabia
3 Faculty of Medicine, Suliman Al Rajhi Colleges, Buraydah, El Qassim, Saudi Arabia, Critical Care Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt, Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Cardiology, Prince Mohammad Bin Abdulaziz Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
5 Department of medicine, College of Medicine, Qassim University, El Qassim, Saudi Arabia
6 Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Qassim University, El Qassim, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Rami M Abazid
Department of Nuclear Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, PO Box 5010, London, ON, N6A 5W9.
Saudi Arabia

Objective: Driving capability can be significantly affected by different heath disorders; cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) should be considered when assessing patients for medical fitness to drive (MFTD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the awareness of Saudi patients about driving recommendations and to assess the incidence of motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) among cardiac patients. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey-based study. Male patients diagnosed with CVDs and who were visiting outpatient departments were invited to complete a questionnaire regarding their awareness of driving recommendations. Patients’ demographics, clinical diagnosis, echocardiography parameters, and time-to-CVD diagnosis were all obtained from the patients’ medical records. Women were excluded because it was illegal for women to drive in Saudi Arabia during the study period. Results: In total, 800 men were included, with a mean age of 54 ± 12 years. Driving counseling had been provided to 241 participants (30%). Of these, 207 (25%) were advised not to drive for a period of between one week and six months. Five percent of the patients had a history of MVAs during the follow-up period of 6.2 ± 4 years. We found that the presence of a dyspnea ≥2, according to the New York Heart Association (NYHA), and a history of loss of consciousness (syncope/pre-syncope) were significantly associated with accidents (46% vs. 20%, P < 0.0001 and 41% vs. 10%, P < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion: Patient–physician discussion about MFTD was only performed with 30% of the patients with CVDs in Saudi Arabia. Dyspnea NYHA class ≥2 or a prior history of syncope were significantly associated with the incidence of MVAs.


How to cite this article:
Abazid RM, Ewid M, Sherif H, Smettei OA, Salim Khan A, Altorbag AA, Alharbi MF, Aljaber AN, Alharbi SM, Altorbak NA, Altorbak SA, Almeman A. Are cardiac patients in Saudi Arabia provided adequate instructions when they should not drive?.Avicenna J Med 2019;9:148-153


How to cite this URL:
Abazid RM, Ewid M, Sherif H, Smettei OA, Salim Khan A, Altorbag AA, Alharbi MF, Aljaber AN, Alharbi SM, Altorbak NA, Altorbak SA, Almeman A. Are cardiac patients in Saudi Arabia provided adequate instructions when they should not drive?. Avicenna J Med [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Dec 5 ];9:148-153
Available from: http://www.avicennajmed.com/article.asp?issn=2231-0770;year=2019;volume=9;issue=4;spage=148;epage=153;aulast=Abazid;type=0