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BRIEF REPORT
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 42-45

Homemade cardiac and vein cannulation ultrasound phantoms for trauma management training in resource-limited settings


1 Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, MI, USA
2 MacNeal Hospital, Berwyn, IL, USA
3 Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Wael Hakmeh
Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Western Michigan University, 1000 Oakland Drive, Kalamazoo, MI 49008.
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ajm.ajm_196_20

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Ultrasound has become an essential skill for trauma management in resource-limited areas. Prohibitive costs of commercial ultrasound phantoms limit the abilities of many hospitals to adequately train health-care providers. We assessed the utility of homemade phantoms in a wartime setting. Thirty physicians and technicians enrolled in a medical training course, sponsored by the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS). Ultrasound simulation models were created onsite by using psyllium, gelatin, a hotel coffee maker, and Pyrex dishes. Lamb hearts were used to teach visual diagnosis and subsequent drainage of pericardial effusions. Penrose drains were used to teach vein identification and cannulation under dynamic ultrasound guidance. Two phantoms with a total of 14 penrose drains were created, serving 30 health-care providers. Feedback from participants was positive and within one month of the course, two cases of pericardial tamponade were diagnosed and surgically treated in the largest trauma hospital operated by SAMS. Context: In resource-limited environments, ultrasound phantoms (models) are cost-prohibitive. Aims: We assessed the utility of homemade phantoms in a resource-limited wartime setting to train Syrian physicians and technicians in vein cannulation and limited cardiac ultrasonography. Settings and Design: Thirty physicians and technicians enrolled in a medical training course, sponsored by SAMS. Methods: Ultrasound simulation models were created onsite by using psyllium, gelatin, a hotel coffee maker, and Pyrex dishes. Lamb hearts were used to teach visual diagnosis and subsequent drainage of pericardial effusions. Penrose drains were used to teach vein identification and cannulation under dynamic ultrasound guidance. Two phantoms with a total of 14 penrose drains were created, serving 30 health-care providers. Statistical Analysis Used: N/A Results: Feedback from participants was positive and within one month of the course, two cases of pericardial tamponade were diagnosed and surgically treated in the largest trauma hospital operated by SAMS. Conclusions: Homemade ultrasound phantoms are a promising cost-effective means for meeting an educational gap in ultrasound training, particularly for resource-limited hospitals and possibly more broadly in residency education.


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